Tag - magnesium deficiency

Investigated: Magnesium

  The mineral magnesium is found all throughout the earth, sea and in plants, animals and humans. It’s the fourth most abundant mineral found in the human body and is actively involved in more than 600 functions of our systems. It helps to convert what we eat into energy, assists in the creation and repair of DNA and RNA, plays a part in muscle movement, works to create new proteins from amino acids and regulates neurotransmitters sending messages in the brain and nervous system. During exercise, magnesium helps to transport blood sugar to the muscles. During a strenuous workout, lactic acid can build up in the muscles and cause cramping but increasing your intake of magnesium can help dispose of the lactic acid. Recent studies indicate that nearly half of the citizens of the United States and Europe get less than the daily recommended amount. Lack of this essential mineral has been linked to migraines and muscle fatigue. It’s also been linked to insulin resistance, one of the leading causes of type 2 diabetes. The muscles and liver cells cannot properly absorb sugar and magnesium plays such an important role in this process. Since high levels of insulin also results in loss of the nutrient through the urine, increasing intake is important. Magnesium deficiency has also been studied as a contributing factor to depression and anxiety. One thought is that the tightening or cramping of muscles triggers the “fight or flight” response, releasing epinephrine and cortisol. It’s is also one of the few nutrients that can increase neuroplasicity, the ability to create and repair brain cells and make new neural connections. Magnesium can be found in foods such as pumpkin seeds, fish like mackerel, salmon and halibut, black beans, avocados, dark chocolate, almonds, cashews, quinoa, swiss chard and spinach. Load more of these foods into your diet to reap the many benefits of magnesium.
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DIY Bath Salts/Benefits of Epsom Salt

Epsom Salt has many therapeutic qualities! Today we’ve got some reasons why this mineral compound, comprised of magnesium and sulfate, does wonders for the body and why you should incorporate a good soak in them to your wellness routine. We’ll also share some links to homemade bath salt recipes so you can try making your own concoctions to give to friends and family and enjoy yourself. Magnesium deficiency is all too common and soaking in epsom salt can naturally boost internal levels of magnesium as it’s easily absorbed through the skin. This benefits many bodily functions including muscle control, boosting energy levels and the ability to eliminate harmful toxins. Epsom Salt also works to alleviate muscle tension, joint pain from inflammation and speeds up healing from bruises and sprains. Researchers have found that magnesium deficiency also has a profound effect on stress so a nice long soak in Epsom salt relaxes the muscles and the mind. Epsom Salt also works wonders as a natural exfoliant to keep skin soft and smooth. It’s not as harsh as typical sodium chloride (table) salt so it’s less drying and irritating. The coarse texture is ideal for removing dead skin and it’s anti-inflammatory properties prevent irritation. You can also use it on hair that is prone to being oily in order to get more volume.  To do this, mix equal parts conditioner and Epsom salt and warming it in a pan. Work the warm mixture through your hair, leave on for 20 minutes then rinse thoroughly.   Finally, it just feels heavenly to take a nice long soak in the tub! Here are links to several simple bath salt recipes for you to try out. Lavender Mint Bath Salts DIY Bath Bombs with Epsom Salt Pink Lemonade Herbal Bath Fizzy Candy Cane Bath Salts Sinus Congestion Bath Soak Vanilla Chai Scrub
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