Tag - eczema

#TBT – Ylang Ylang – History and Benefits

Spices, herbs, tinctures and essential oils have been used for millennia to season our food, heal our bodies and boost our spirits. In our Throwback Thursday (#TBT) series, we at re:iimmune will take you back in history to learn how these gifts from Mother Nature have been used. We'll focus on their use through the ages and beneficial purposes in regard to nutrition, natural health and household care. Today we focus on the benefits of ylang ylang essential oil!

Ylang ylang (e-lang e-lang), often called “the poor man’s jasmine”, comes from the sweet smelling, star-shaped flowers of the ylang-ylang tree. Native to Malaysia, Indonesia and other east Asian lowland countries the tree does not produce flowers until five years of growth but then produces up to 45 pounds of flowers for up to fifty years. High quality oil made from the flowers has a sweet and musky aroma and is prized for it’s amazing scent. However, indigenous peoples of the areas where it grows quickly discovered it was effective as a natural treatment for skin irritations such as cuts, burns and insect bites as it inhibits microbial growth and disinfects wounds. Indonesians scatter the petals over the beds of newlywed couples on their wedding night. A hair pomade, Macassar oil, developed in the Molucca Islands became so popular in Victorian England that it led to the creation of the antimacassar, a decorative chair covering used to keep the oil from staining upholstery. In the 20th century, French chemists discovered that the oil was useful in treating intestinal infections and that the oil had a calming effect on the body, specifically the heart. Eventually, ylang ylang essential oil was used as the top floral note in the now famous Chanel No. 5 perfume. Ylang ylang oil has also proven beneficial in treating eczema. Caused by malfunctioning sebaceous glands which don’t provide an adequate production of sebum, eczema is a painful skin disorder. Ylang ylang soothes inflammation and assists the skin in regulating sebum production.  It’s also loaded with organic compounds that are beneficial to the hair and scalp. Since it’s known for uplifting mood and promoting relaxation, it’s a terrific addition to massage oil. If taken in excessive amounts, it can result in nausea and headache so it is important to use ylang ylang oil in recommended doses.
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#TBT – Thyme – History and Benefits

Spices, herbs, tinctures and essential oils have been used for millennia to season our food, heal our bodies and boost our spirits. In our Throwback Thursday (#TBT) series, we at re:iimmune will take you back in history to learn how these gifts from Mother Nature have been used. We'll focus on their use through the ages and beneficial purposes in regard to nutrition, natural health and household care. This week the focus is on the powerful protector and palate pleaser: thyme! Thyme, the most common variety being Thymus vulgaris, is an evergreen herb with a fragrance Rudyard Kipling described as being, “like dawn in paradise.” There are a couple of possible origins for the name. It may be derived from the Greek thumos and/or the Latin fumus, which both mean “smoke” or the Greek word thumos can also signify courage. The Greeks burnt the herb as incense in their temples believing it a source of courage. Later, during the Middle Ages, ladies would give knights and warriors gifts embroidered with a bee hovering over a spray of thyme as a symbol of protection. Danish and German folklore listed wild thyme patches as a place favorable to find fairies. Thyme does have some powerfully protective disinfecting and deodorizing properties. The disinfecting qualities of thymol, a primary component of the oil, has been useful in treating psoriasis, eczema and ringworm. It’s also useful in dental care, traditionally used to treat tooth decay, gingivitis, plaque and bad breath as it helps to kill germs. It can help keep those outdoor pests away too and treat the bites you may suffer from the little critters. For women, it’s been used to help improve progesterone production and relieve the symptoms of PMS and menopause. Thyme is also a powerful immune system booster, encouraging white blood cell formation and increasing resistance to germs and bacteria. This makes it a great herb to use in your defense during cold and flu season. As for its culinary uses, it’s best known for flavoring meat dishes, soups and stews. In some parts of the Middle East it’s a vital ingredient for the condiment za’atar. Thyme is also a component of the bouquet garni and Herbes de Provence. It can be used fresh or dried and in its dried form it retains its flavour better than most other herbs. DIY Lemon Thyme Upholstery and Carpet Deodorizer Honey Roasted Beets with Balsamic and Thyme Eczema Skin Salve DIY
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Eczema – Natural Remedies and Link to Gut Health

Eczema is a chronic and irritating problem for many people. It’s a type of inflammation of the skin called dermatitis that causes redness, scaling, swelling, itching and bleeding. An estimated 35 million Americans suffer from one form or another of the condition. Seventy percent of cases develop in children prior to age five and over half of infants who have eczema will continue to have symptoms into adulthood. There are three forms; atopic, contact and seborrhoic dermatitis. The latter, seborrhoic dermatitis is also known as cradle crap or dandruff, causing dry or oily scaling of the scalp. Contact dermatitis is the result of contact with different types of allergens and irritants found in creams, foods, plants and some metals. Atopic dermatitis is the result of allergies like hay fever and typically makes itself known at an early age on the face, scalp, neck, inside elbows and behind the knees. There are several triggers of eczema, including what’s happening in the digestive system. Infants who are bottle fed are more likely to develop eczema as they are not getting enough essential fatty acids that they would receive from breast milk. Other people have trouble converting linoleic acid to anti-inflammatory hormone-like substances called prostaglandins. Much research is now being done on the connection between gut health, emotions and skin. Emotional stress results in a depletion of digestive enzymes and digestive and skin issues emerge. Or in cases of “leaky gut syndrome” the intestines become porous allowing bits of undigested food to enter the bloodstream which can cause allergic reactions. Candida, a form of yeast is also linked to skin irritations such as eczema. So what to do if you are suffering from a form of eczema? We’ve got some suggestions for you including things to avoid and foods to eat. . . Re:iimmune Hydration is extremely important when it comes to maintaining a healthy intestinal tract. The L-Glutamine in our intestinal support formula works to rebuild the delicate tissue of the intestinal lining, while ginger aids in decreasing inflammation and zinc which benefits the skin’s ability to heal. re:iimmune also combines a variety of probiotic strains as well as one essential prebiotic which acts as food for the probiotics to thrive. These probiotics allow the body to produce the beneficial bacteria your digestive system needs to function properly. Get the right nutrients in your diet A diet rich in essential fatty acids, zinc, Vitamins A and B6, and beta-carotene is key. Some good choices are bananas, bone broths, potatoes, sweet potatoes, green onions, buckwheat, rice milk and mung beans.  Skin Soothers and Relievers
  • Calendula is considered one of the best topical treatments for eczema
  • Aloe Vera Gel - cooling and soothing
  • St. John’s Wort gel
  • Vitamin E and goldenseal are effective in relieving itching
  • Tea Tree Oil
  • Honey
  • Coconut Oil
  • Oatmeal
  • Witch Hazel
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