Tag - diabetes

Whole Food Spotlight – Cranberries

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well if one has not dined well” - Virginia Woolf

It is in this spirit that we present re:iimmune’s new blog series “Whole Foods Spotlight” where we will focus in on a specific whole food, its nutritional benefits and provide you with a few links to some tasty recipes that may inspire you to add more of that particular food into your diet. After all, good health begins with good nutrition! This week we're looking forward to the holidays ahead and cranberries on our table!

screen-shot-2016-10-26-at-2-11-38-pm Cranberries are a group of evergreen dwarf shrubs or trailing vines common to Canada and the northern United States thanks to the receding glaciers of the Ice Age which carved out bogs perfect for their growth. Native Americans of the region used cranberries as wound medicine, as a dye and of course as a source of food, including pemmican. Algonquin peoples called the red berries Sassamanash and it’s thought they may have introduced the starving English settlers of Massachusetts to the berry. Sometimes called “bearberries” as bears feast on them regularly, it was the early English and European settlers who began calling them “craneberries” as they thought the expanding flower, stem, calyx and petals of the plant looked like the neck, head and bill of a crane. The word then morphed into cranberry. Cranberries most widely believed benefit is in the treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections. However, don’t reach for the juice as studies are showing that cranberry capsules may be more effective. That beautiful ruby red color of the cranberry comes from anthocyanin. Anthocyanins are a class of naturally occurring pigments in plants responsible for rich reds and purples in berries, eggplant, blood oranges and cranberries. A number of studies suggest that anthocyanins help improve sharpness of vision, reduce the risk of cataracts and macular degeneration and that they may also be beneficial in fighting cancer, diabetes and some neurological diseases. Interestingly enough, it is the way cranberries are harvested that gives them such great concentrations of anthocyanins. According to “The World’s Healthiest Foods”, Many cranberries are water-harvested. Water-harvesting means that the cranberries are grown in bogs and floated in water to allow for easy harvesting. For many years, water-harvesting of cranberries has been looked upon as an industry convenience. It's simply easier to harvest berries that are floating on the surface. However, recent research has shown that the anthocyanin content of cranberries (the phytonutrients that give the berries their amazing red color) is increased in direct proportion to the amount of natural sunlight striking the berry. If berries floating on top of water get exposed to increased amounts of natural sunlight (in comparison to other growing and harvesting conditions), they are likely to develop greater concentrations of anthocyanins. These greater concentrations of anthocyanins are likely to provide us with stronger health benefits. In other words, water-harvesting may turn out to provide more than just harvest convenience. If it can expose cranberries to greater amounts of natural sunlight, it can increase phytonutrient health benefits that involve the unique antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of anthocyanins. Unfortunately, fresh cranberries are a fruit with a short season. They are harvested between Labor Day and Halloween, appearing at the market from October through December. Fortunately, cranberries freeze well and can be kept for several years. To freeze them, spread them out on a cookie sheet and place in the freezer. Wait a couple of hours and then transfer the frozen berries to a freezer bag. They will be soft once thawed and should be used immediately. To select quality cranberries, look for ones that are deep red in color, plump and firm to the touch. Cranberry Apple Quinoa Salad Honey Roasted Butternut Squash with Cranberries and Feta Holiday Cranberry Sauce
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Why Diabetic Friendly is Better for EveryBODY

sugar free reiimmune, diabetic friendly, no sugar added

In theory we all recognize that processed chemicals aren’t good to put into our bodies on a regular basis. We can agree that eating whole foods will benefit our health, trumping a microwave dinner any day, but what do we know about the actual chemicals we’re avoiding besides that they’re bad for us? Sometimes it’s good to know why you’re calling something bad in order to take your claim seriously. When re:iimmune® was created, every single ingredient was carefully considered and scrutinized.

 

Most hydration drinks are loaded with sugar and unnecessary chemicals, and that’s exactly why it was vital for re:iimmune® to be diabetic friendly, Clinical Strength Hydration™. Usually your mind would automatically just assume that means it’s sugar free, but this concept goes much deeper than the table sugar you store in your pantry. We don’t use sucralose, dextrose or sugar-instead, we use agave insulin extracted from an all natural, organic, blue agave plant. Organic agave extract is rich in nutrients, and is also considered a “super fiber” that promotes digestive health by serving as a prebiotic- aiding the good bacteria that lives in our gut.

 

Why is one of the most important questions you can ask, so why do we choose not to use other commonly used sugar substitutes? Good question!

 

Sucralose, a commonly found sugar substitute, is technically just chlorinated sugar according to it’s processing. There are a lot of big words associated with the research on sucralose, but the important thing to know is that it has been found to be 300,000 times more carcinogenic than DDT, an insecticide that was banned for it’s extreme toxicity. The compounds formed in this process have been linked to a number of diseases, birth defects and immune dysfunction. There you have it! Why would a product that was created to make you feel better contain a chemical linked to the very things we’re fighting?

 

Dextrose, is a form of sugar that is most commonly made from corn that is genetically modified and is chemically identical to glucose (blood sugar). Being as I just used the diabetic dirty word, glucose, you can assume the obvious: it spikes blood sugar levels like crazy which is terrible for the average person, but especially for anyone who is pregnant, nursing, hyperglycemic or diabetic. It also takes a slug at the body’s general immune system function. This particular derivative of sugar is most commonly going to be GMO, and that’s a whole other can of worms I’ll let you open on your own time!

 

Sugar is important to recognize as harmful beyond the commonly thought of cavities and love handles as it’s linked to a myriad of dangers from disrupted hormonal cycles, the development of diabetes itself, and a vast amount of cardiovascular issues.

 

As timing would have it, the FDA recently announced new food labeling restrictions to adjust the serving sizes according to the amount one would typically consume, and for the first time all labels will be required to list added sugars! Knowing what we’re consuming and why, is one major step in the right direction towards a healthy and functional lifestyle.

Now you know re:iimmune® is sugar, dextrose and sucralose free and WHY,  we hope you also have some valuable information that you can carry with you on your next grocery shopping trip.

 

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