Tag - arthritis

#TT – Pine – History and Benefits

Spices, herbs, tinctures and essential oils have been used for millennia to season our food, heal our bodies and boost our spirits. In our Throwback Thursday (#TBT) series, we at re:iimmune will take you back in history to learn how these gifts from Mother Nature have been used. We'll focus on their use through the ages and beneficial purposes in regard to nutrition, natural health and household care. Today we're talking about invigorating pine! 

organic-pinee-oil Fragrant pine trees have had a long history of use by many cultures, which viewed them as protection against evil spirits. Ancient peoples of Europe thought of the cones as the eyes of the tree, which could see into magical realms. Boughs of pine were brought into homes during the winter solstice and hung above doors in the belief that it would provide protection from spirits of the Underworld. It’s easy to understand how members of the evergreen family, which keep their brilliant green color through the coldest of winters and smell so invigorating, would come to symbolize vitality and longevity. Pine oil, known for its refreshing, clean, woodsy smell is extracted from the needles of the Pinus sylvestris tree and from ancient to modern times humans have valued its many benefits. In the Home Historically, mattresses were stuffed with pine needles to ward off lice and fleas. It also has the ability to remove dangerous molds, bacteria and yeast. It’s one of the most beneficial essential oils to use as a natural home deodorizer as it eliminates bacteria and microbes which lead to contamination and odors. It can even help to destroy toxins in the air which cause colds and the flu. Because it is so great at neutralizing odors, many people put a few drops of pine oil into shoes to keep them smelling fresher. Respiratory Relief It's also fantastic for relieving respiratory ailments. Steam inhalation containing pine oil can help clear congestion and soothe the lungs. Even when not sick or suffering from allergies, many use the oil for it’s refreshing and energy boosting powers. Muscle Soother Sufferers of joint pain, muscle aches and arthritis can benefit from the use of pine oil in massage. It’s analgesic properties help reduce pain and it’s an anti-inflammatory agent as well. Always use pine oil with a carrier oil (jojoba, sweet almond, coconut, etc.) and never use undiluted directly on your skin. Be careful to keep pine oil away from your eyes and the inside of your nose so that mucus membranes are not irritated. Homemade Essential Oil Diffuser Christmas Tree Ornament Peppermint Pine Headache Salve Homemade Natural “Pine Sol”
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Investigated: Inflammation and the Benefits of Ginger and Zinc

  twenty20_ig-465450059976468957_23746337 Inflammation in and of itself is actually a natural and protective response by the body. White blood cells and the substances they produce help to fight against infection from bacteria and viruses. Unfortunately, there are instances when this natural defense system goes out of whack or in cases such as arthritis and other autoimmune diseases, inflammation is occurring even though there’s no bacterial or viral infection to fight against. Chronic inflammation is painful and it is extremely damaging to our bodies. Numerous studies are revealing that it is linked to diseases such as heart disease, Alzheimer’s and cancer. re:iimmune was created with an understanding that dehydration exacerbates inflammation in the body. Our solution provides Clinical Strength Hydration® with a rich package of health-supporting ingredients including probiotics, prebiotic, electrolytes, L-Glutatmine, zinc and ginger. After testing re:iimmune’s capabilities, a recent study published by the Journal of Nutrition and Health shared that testing indicated that “five inflammatory markers were significantly altered as a result of incubation with the re:iimmune product.” Ginger and zinc were added to our formula for a variety of reasons. Ginger is effective against nausea and zinc is known to help promote immunity. In addition, both ginger and zinc have anti-inflammatory qualities! Ginger contains phtytonutrients called gingerols known for their potency in reducing inflammation, muscular pain and swelling. The Arthritis Foundation notes in their article “Health Benefits of Ginger for Arthritis” that a University of Miami study proposes that “ginger extract could one day be a substitute to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The study compared the effects of a highly concentrated ginger extract to placebo in 247 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. The ginger reduced pain and stiffness in knee joints by 40 percent over the placebo.” A large percentage of the population is deficient in zinc, including an estimated 40% of older adults, which compromises our ability to fight off common infections. Research out of Ohio State University found that zinc “gently taps the breaks” on an over-response of the immune system and that  “a protein lures zinc into key cells that are first-responders against infection. The zinc then interacts with a process that is vital to the fight against infection and by doing so helps balance the immune response.” This process prevents excess and damaging inflammation in the body.
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Turmeric – History and Benefits

Spices, herbs, tinctures and essential oils have been used for millennia to season our food, heal our bodies and boost our spirits. In our Throwback Thursday (#TBT) series, we at re:iimmune will take you back in history to learn how these gifts from Mother Nature have been used. We'll focus on their use through the ages and beneficial purposes in regard to nutrition, natural health and household care. Today we learn about the treasure that is turmeric!

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The people of India have long known what a treasure turmeric is and have used it in their cooking, sacred rights, in their beauty routines and as a healing helper for many ailments. Pottery discovered near New Dehli contained residue from the spice used as early back as 2500 BCE. It’s botanical name is Curcuma longa and it produces both flower and rhizome, a stem that grows underground, similar to ginger. The rhizome is the part of the plant that gives us golden hued turmeric. Indian curry gets its yellow coloring from it and it’s long been used in many other dishes, favored for its ability to aid in digestion and improve circulation. Turmeric was also used in India and other surrounding countries in sacred ceremonies. In southern India, an amulet made of the turmeric rhizome was believed to protect the wearer from evil spirits. Saffron colored Buddhist robes are achieved by using the spice as a dye. Hindus also view it as sacred. During a wedding, a string dyed yellow with turmeric is tied around the bride’s neck by the groom. The mangala sutra, as the necklace is called shows that the woman is married and capable of running a household. It’s sacred standing is owed to its remarkable healing properties as well. Ayurvedic medicine is an ancient Indian practice of natural healing and these discoveries of turmeric’s abilities by these ancient peoples benefit us still today. They discovered that burning turmeric could relieve congestion and that the spice was also helpful in healing wounds, bruises and a variety of other skin problems. Turmeric is prized for its many benefits in a skin care/beauty regimen. It’s been used successfully to aid in inhibiting facial hair growth, smoothing and evening out skin tone and lessening dark circles under the eyes. Its wonderful as an exfoliant and in treating dandruff of the scalp. Many swear by it’s ability to naturally whiten teeth and it’s also known to be effective as a treatment for cracked heels and softening the skin of the feet. Head to toe, turmeric has a myriad of benefits for the human body. This includes internally. Turmeric is a potent natural anti-inflammatory and painkiller with abilities that have been shown to be as effective as many anti-inflammatory drugs but without the side effects. This makes it very helpful in dealing with arthritis and muscle pain. Numerous other studies are being done on its possible powers in treating some forms of cancer including melanoma, slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s by removing amyloid plaque buildup in the brain and its abilities to aid in fat metabolism and help in weight management. There are so many different ways and good reasons to incorporate more turmeric into your diet and beauty routine. Below you’ll find a few links to ways to do just that! Top Ten Best Beauty Remedies Using Turmeric Golden Turmeric Milk Recipe Healing Carrot Soup with Turmeric and Ginger
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