Health

Missourian Award to Dr. Kerri Miller, founder of re:iimmune

Eight accomplished community leaders from the State of Missouri will be honored at the 24th annual Missourian Award ceremony on September 23rd, 2017 at the Chateau on the Lake Resort in Branson, Missouri.

The Missourian Award was founded by John Q. Hammons and Ralph Slavens for the purpose of acknowledging the most accomplished citizens of Missouri.  To be selected, individuals must have been born in the State of Missouri, or under exceptional circumstances, they may qualify by having spent at least fifteen years of their adult life in the state.  Nominees must have made an outstanding contribution to their state or nation in one of the following fields of endeavor: civics, business, arts, or politics. However, no person from the political field are considered until they have been out of an elected or appointed position for at least two years.

This year’s distinguished honorees are:

  • Dr. Keesag Baron, Cardiologist, Baron Cardiology
  • Ms. Jacqueline Dowdy, Chief Executive Officer, John Q. Hammons Hotels and Resorts
  • Mr. Steve Edwards, President and Chief Executive Officer, CoxHealth
  • Mr. Bob Helm, Managing Partner, Elliott Robinson & Co. CPAs
  • Dr. Hal Higdon, Chancellor and President, Ozarks Technical Community College
  • Dr. Kerri Miller, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Make People Better
  • Dr. Daniel Scodary, Neurosurgeon and Medical Director, SSM Neurosciences Institute
  • Mr. Jim Thomas (posthumously), Entrepreneur and Innovator, Branson community

These incredible individuals, along with Past President and Founder Ralph Slavens, will be honored at the annual ceremony being held at Chateau on the Lake, Branson, Missouri.  Ceremony proceeds benefit of American Heart Association.

For event tickets and table availability, please contact The Missourian Award Chariman Jim Hodge at (417) 860-6274 or via email at missourianaward@gmail.com

How re:iimmune helped 91-year-old World War II Veteran

I’m Robert A. Susdorf, a 91-year-old World War II veteran who was an electrical engineer and technical manager for 40 years. I have always been very active and have kept busy with projects. In the past ten years, I have had 2 Aortic valve replacements, prostate cancer (now in remission), Melanoma skin cancer (surgically under control), and now Multiple Myeloma., as well as miscellaneous surgeries (lung, hernia, and disc fusion). I have C.O.P.D., congestive heart failure, and neuropathy.

I felt weak, had low energy, tired quickly, was light headed, and lost a lot of my small motor skills.

After two months of taking Re:immune daily, my body has changed remarkably. I feel more awake and stronger. I have much more energy and enjoy doing physical things. I feel mentally sharper and more awake which makes my life much more enjoyable. I’m amazed at the effectiveness of this product!

Investigated: Magnesium

 

The mineral magnesium is found all throughout the earth, sea and in plants, animals and humans. It’s the fourth most abundant mineral found in the human body and is actively involved in more than 600 functions of our systems. It helps to convert what we eat into energy, assists in the creation and repair of DNA and RNA, plays a part in muscle movement, works to create new proteins from amino acids and regulates neurotransmitters sending messages in the brain and nervous system.

During exercise, magnesium helps to transport blood sugar to the muscles. During a strenuous workout, lactic acid can build up in the muscles and cause cramping but increasing your intake of magnesium can help dispose of the lactic acid.

Recent studies indicate that nearly half of the citizens of the United States and Europe get less than the daily recommended amount. Lack of this essential mineral has been linked to migraines and muscle fatigue. It’s also been linked to insulin resistance, one of the leading causes of type 2 diabetes. The muscles and liver cells cannot properly absorb sugar and magnesium plays such an important role in this process. Since high levels of insulin also results in loss of the nutrient through the urine, increasing intake is important.

Magnesium deficiency has also been studied as a contributing factor to depression and anxiety. One thought is that the tightening or cramping of muscles triggers the “fight or flight” response, releasing epinephrine and cortisol. It’s is also one of the few nutrients that can increase neuroplasicity, the ability to create and repair brain cells and make new neural connections.

Magnesium can be found in foods such as pumpkin seeds, fish like mackerel, salmon and halibut, black beans, avocados, dark chocolate, almonds, cashews, quinoa, swiss chard and spinach. Load more of these foods into your diet to reap the many benefits of magnesium.

Renew Your Energy – 5 Ways to Put the Spring Back in Your Step

The next time you reach that point in your day when you are feeling sluggish and need to renew your energy, step away from the sweets and the caffeine and try one or more of these five tips to put the spring back into your step!

Take a Nap

Obviously, this option isn’t always readily available to us in the middle of the day. However, if your schedule allows you to take a siesta, the ideal power nap time length to renew your energy level is 20 minutes. A nap in this time frame keeps you in the lightest stage on non-REM sleep and can improve alertness, performance and mood.

Have a Healthy Snack

Food is energy after all! The right kinds of foods can make all the difference. Foods like beans, lentils and spinach which are rich in iron are known to help energy levels. Foods that have a good mix of fats and protein, like nuts and yogurt, can also help with that mid-afternoon slump. Fresh fruit which contains natural sugars and fiber to keep blood sugar levels steady is another great choice.

Stretch It Out

Many of us spend too much time sitting during the workday and it’s important to get the blood circulating and stretch our muscles. Yoga15.com recommends these 8 yoga moves to help give you energy and help your back, hips and knees while your at it!

Scent Stimulation

The inhalation of certain essential oils has been used for thousands of years to enhance mood and boost energy levels. Lemon, ginger, rosemary, grapefruit, peppermint and eucalyptus are all known to help clear mental fatigue and lift the spirits.

Hydrate!

Dehydration is the main culprit for causing feelings of sluggishness! In fact, that tired feeling is often the first signal that our body gives us that we aren’t taking in enough water. Eight glasses a day or half of your body weight in ounces is the recommended daily intake. Add a packet of re:iimmune to that water for the added benefit of L-Glutamine, which assists the cells of the intestines in water absorption. We steered clear of sugar, sucralose and dextrose, opting for fructan derived from agave as the sweetener. This fiber helps to sweeten, boost energy and is a natural prebiotic to promote healthy bacteria in the gut.

Taking Care of Your Liver

The liver is our largest internal organ, roughly the size of a football and is positioned under the lower rib cage on the right side of the body. It’s also considered a gland because it secretes chemicals used in other bodily functions. The liver is essential for survival as it helps clean our blood by eliminating harmful chemicals, produces bile which helps us break down fats in food and turns glucose into glycogen and stores it for when the body needs a quick burst of energy.

Liver cells also make many proteins required for blood clotting and the maintenance of fluid within the circulatory system. Detoxification is another key responsibility; it converts ammonia into urea which is excreted in the urine by the kidneys. It also breaks down alcohol, drugs, medication, insulin and hormones in the body. Finally, the liver acts as a storage unit in the body for vitamin B12, A, D and K as well as folic acid and iron.

With all of the important processes your liver is responsible for,  it makes sense to take really good care of it! Here are some ways to keep it in tip top shape. . .

  • Moderate your alcohol intake. It can damage the cells of the organ and leads to scarring called cirrhosis, which can be deadly. The National Institue on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism defines moderate intake as up to four alcholic drinks for men and three for women in any single day with a maximum of 14 weekly drinks for men and 7 drinks for women. 
  • Exercise and maintain a healthy weight. Doing so will keep you from the risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease which also leads to cirrhosis.
  • Watch your intake of painkillers such as acetaminophen as it is damaging to the liver if taken too much.

A healthy diet is also beneficial to the liver. Check back with us next week when we’ll share several foods that are beneficial to the health of your liver!

 

Stay Safe in the Snow – Hypothermia

In our third and final piece on how to Stay Safe in the Snow, we are sharing ways to avoid, recognize and treat hypothermia. In cold temperatures, the body cannot produce heat as fast as it’s losing it and this can lead to serious health problems. Hypothermia happens gradually and people become confused and unaware that this life threatening condition is happening to them.

Avoiding Hypothermia

  • Dress appropriately! Make sure areas most likely to be affected by frostbite are covered including your nose, ears, cheeks, chin and fingers. It is best to dress in layers and it’s best if the outer layer is something wind and waterproof. As for the inner layers, go for wool or fleece. Do not wear cotton as the base layer. Because cotton retains moisture, dries slowly and loses its thermal properties causing your core temperature to drop.
  • Carry at least one thermal heat blanket in your car’s emergency kit.
  • Avoid activities where you might sweat a lot if possible. Stay as dry as possible.
  • Rain, sweat or snow can cause hypothermia in temperatures as warm as 40 degrees Farenheit. Be aware!

Recognizing Hypothermia

  • Uncontrollable shivering means the body cannot warm itself.
  • Loss of coordination
  • Slurred speech
  • Difficulty forming thoughts/confusion
  • Lack of energy/unconsciousness
  • Weak pulse/shallow breathing

Treating Hypothermia

  • If you cannot call 911 or get emergency help, the first thing to do is seek any kind of shelter you can find, the warmer the better.
  • Remove wet clothes immediately. Get into dry clothes and/or  layers of blankets. Skin to skin contact is beneficial.
  • If using warming packs/compresses from a first aid kit, place them on the chest and groin area not the legs or arms. This will force cold blood to rush to the heart.
  • Do NOT drench the body in hot water or rub skin vigorously as this is too taxing on the heart.
  • It’s okay to drink warm liquids slowly but avoid alcohol and caffeine.
  • Since skin may be numb, victims of frostbite may unintentionally harm themselves further. Do not walk on feet or toes affected by frostbite unless absolutely necessary for survival. Don’t rub or massage frostbit areas.Don’t use a fireplace, heat lamp, stove, heating pad or electric blanket for warming this can be damaging to the skin and if the heart is struggling, could cause cardiac arrest. It is good to place afflicted areas in warm-to-the-touch water, not hot.

Dangers of Sleep Deprivation

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It’s that time of year when many of us are burning the candle at both ends. Sleep deprivation can become something we don’t even realize that we are doing to ourselves. With work, school, parenting and all of the busyness of the holidays you may be feeling exhausted yet still find yourself fighting the urge to sleep. Or the time change, darker days and all there is to do might make you feel like going to bed directly after dinner to catch a few more hours of sleep. You just might want to heed that impulse instead of staying up to play on social media, write one more email or watch one more show because sleep deprivation can do serious harm to both body and mind.

The National Institute of Health reports that the average American adult sleeps less than 7 hours each night. However 8 to 10 hours is the recommendation for optimum function and while those few missed hours might not seem like much, they really add up. Lack of sleep really messes with the mind.

The hippocampus is a moon shaped structure in the frontal lobe. This is the area used when the waking mind encodes or learns new information. Later, while sleeping, this same area “replays” that information to help it stick with us. If you are skipping out on sleep, you are putting your ability to form long-term memories at risk. Scientists are also finding that sleep starved brains are more prone to incorporate false information into memories.

Well rested folks also have highly active temporal lobes, the region of the brain responsible for language processing. Slurring and difficulty enunciating words is a hallmark of sleep deprivation. Wit is also affected as sleep deprivation impacts divergent thinking, necessary for us to switch topics and make connections between thoughts and ideas.

Sleep deprivation also causes a decrease in the neurotransmitters responsible for mood regulation and amplifies anticipatory reactions fueling the fire for depression and/or anxiety to set in. Not getting enough sleep also makes us grouches. In a well rested brain, the amygdala which is responsible for emotional processing and the medial prefrontal cortex responsible for regulating feelings are connected and working in unison. When we don’t get enough sleep, that connection is weakened and we are more prone to angry outbursts.

In addition, sleep deprivation is also connected with reduced immunity, frequent colds and infections, weight gain, increased risk of diabetes, heart disease and impaired motor skills increasing risk of accidents. So listen to your body when it tells you that 8pm is a perfectly reasonable time to go to bed even when the lure of screen time calls. Unplug, unwind and get those extra zzz’s your body craves!

Carrier Oils for Every Skin Type

 

herbal-oils

Last week we talked about the dry skin blues and some ways to help keep it at bay. Today we’re focusing one one of the best things you can do for your skin, the use of plant derived carrier oils to help rehydrate and moisturize dry skin. Skin types vary and maybe the opposite, oily skin, is your issue or perhaps you have combination skin. In any case, there are carrier oils that are right for you!

It may seem odd to put oil on your face, it’s a much more common practice in England and other places in the world. The thing is that your skin naturally produces oil called sebum. When it’s washed away, your skin craves more and by keeping a balance by replenishing with the right kinds of carrier oils, you may find that you’ll help combat a number of issues and have happier, healthier skin. Few of the plant oils we will discuss have any kind of significant smell so we’ll include some ideas for essential oils which you can add a few drops of to your carrier oil.

Here are a few, easy to find carrier oils which can be used on both face and body and which types of skin they are best suited for. . .

Jojoba Oil  

Jojoba is a type of shrub found in the deserts of California, Arizona and Utah. The great thing about it is that it mimics the consistency of sebum and therefore it absorbs well into the skin. Jojoba, pronounced “ho-ho-ba”, can be used on any skin type with great benefit.

Evening Primrose Oil

We know it sounds strange to use oil on already oily skin but for some folks, it actually can help balance you out and keep the skin from over producing sebum. Evening Primrose Oil taken internally can even assist in balancing out hormones. One of the best plant oils for reducing inflammation and promoting elasticity.

Coconut Oil

The internet is chock full of articles about the many, many beneficial uses of coconut oil and it’s one of the best things for dry skin! However, folks who are acne prone may want to stick with jojoba. It is heavy and it will take a few minutes to sink in but when it does, it provides amazing relief for dry skin.

Apricot Kernel Oil

This easily absorbed carrier oil is great for those with combination to dry skin types. It’s anti-inflammatory and antibacterial which helps against acne causing bacteria.

Grapeseed Oil

This  works well for most skin types and is very light and easily absorbed. It’s chock full of Vitamin E which helps moisturize and tighten the skin. It’s great at speeding up the healing of acne and reduces redness and inflammation.

Essential Oils

For normal skin types: Chamomile, Lavender, Fennel, Rose, Sandalwood

For oily skin types: Cedarwood, Bergamot, Clary Sage, Grapefruit

For dry skin types: Ylang, Ylang, Rose Geranium, Roman Chamomile

For acne prone skin: Tea Tree, Thyme, Bergamot, Vetiver

Keep in mind that any kind of change to your skincare routine typically comes with a transition period where you might notice a few breakouts. Stick with it for a couple of weeks to truly get an idea of whether it’s working for you or not.

Dealing with Dry Skin

Has the weather got you feeling itchy? Dry skin is a major problem for people all year round. Never fear, we’ve got some tips for you to help you stay smooth and soft.

Our skin is our largest organ, measuring around 20 square feet! As with all the organs in your body, the most important thing you can do for your skin is to drink plenty of water and stay hydrated. re:iimmune can help in that department! Sometimes to get hydration to optimum levels your body might need a bit of assistance. The L-Glutamine and electrolyte balancing nutrients in re:iimmune can help give a boost when trying to stay well hydrated.

Speaking of water, another tip to keep in mind is avoiding super hot showers. Whereas ingesting water is excellent for your skin, frequent bathing in hot water can make dry skin worse. Keep the shower temps down and make sure to replenish the oils stripped from your skin during bathing with a good moisturizer. Check out our post on how various plant oils, not lotion, might be your best bet!

Before we talk moisturizing, there’s another important step in keeping your skin at it’s best. Exfoliation is key! Dead skin cells need to be dealt with and there are several ways to do this. Alpha-hydroxy acids are essentially fruit acids that help to eliminate dead skin cells. One of the best is pineapple! In Sri Lanka, women have used pineapple on their skin for centuries to smooth their skin. Pineapple contains an enzyme called bromelain which literally eats up dead skin cells! Other great natural exfoliates include baking soda, apple cider vinegar, rice bran and oatmeal.

As with water, the food we eat plays a huge part in the health of our organs and skin is no different! Here are a few suggestions of items to add to your diet which have great benefits to your skin’s health. . .

Walnuts – Omega-3 fatty acids increase your skin’s ability to retain moisture.

Cantaloupe – Chock full of choline, Vitamin K and E which keep skin healthy and radiant.

Watermelon – No brainer! It’s 93% water, aiding in hydration. It also contains vitamins A, B6 and C to repair and protect your skin.

Kale – Some studies have shown that the indole-3-carbonal in Kale boosts DNA repair in our cells and may help block the growth of skin cancer cells.

Other food helpers in the struggle to keep skin looking great include strawberries, chia seeds, pumpkin seeds and avocados. So eat, drink your water and keep your skin merry this winter season!

Coping with Fall Allergies Naturally

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Suffering from fall allergies? The main culprit of the seasonal sniffles is ragweed. We feel its wrath during the spring and then it typically begins to release its pollen during the warm days of August, lasting all the way into October. Because it can travel for hundreds of miles in the wind, even if it doesn’t grow where you live you may still be suffering the effects. Today we’ve got some ideas for you on how to prevent and deal with your fall allergies.

Know Your Enemy!

If you do suffer from ragweed allergies, you should also minimize the following foods in your diet as they may exacerbate the symptoms: bananas, melon and zucchini. While we just sang the praises of chamomile in a recent post, those suffering from fall allergies may want to step away from the chamomile tea for a time too. Chamomile belongs to the same family of plants as ragweed. So as you might guess, it can also worsen your allergy symptoms.

Clean It Up!

One of the best things you can do to ease and prevent fall allergies is to rid your home of dust and allergens as much as possible. While we all want to save a little money and turn the air conditioner off, open windows let that pollen you are trying to avoid into your home. So keep an eye on the allergy index/pollen count and on those days, you may want to consider keeping the windows closed. Also, many people use humidifiers to help with breathing, but dehumidifiers may actually be better if you are sensitive to dust or mold as both flourish in humidity.

Don’t forget to clean up outside. Mold is another huge trigger for fall allergies and it flourishes in damp spots outdoors. Take the time to clean up those rotting leaves and your sinuses will thank you.

When you come back inside, leave those shoes at the door! Shoes track in pollen, dust and germs. Leaving them at the door and going shoeless in the house will help cut down on cleaning and protect you from illness and worsened allergies.

Wash it Away!

You know we’re all about hydration! Staying hydrated helps keep your system in top shape and will help to decrease allergy symptoms of dry throat and a runny nose. Add some re:iimmune to that water and you’re body will receive hydration support and the benefits of prebiotics and probiotics. These keep gut flora in balance which helps make your system stronger against susceptibility to allergies. Many people also find relief in flushing their sinuses with a neti pot. Showering regularly will also help keep the pollen at bay and relieve symptoms.
Tomorrow we’ll also share some other natural helpers in the battle against fall allergies, such as specific foods and essential oils. Check back in with us!