Digestion

How re:iimmune helped 91-year-old World War II Veteran

I’m Robert A. Susdorf, a 91-year-old World War II veteran who was an electrical engineer and technical manager for 40 years. I have always been very active and have kept busy with projects. In the past ten years, I have had 2 Aortic valve replacements, prostate cancer (now in remission), Melanoma skin cancer (surgically under control), and now Multiple Myeloma., as well as miscellaneous surgeries (lung, hernia, and disc fusion). I have C.O.P.D., congestive heart failure, and neuropathy.

I felt weak, had low energy, tired quickly, was light headed, and lost a lot of my small motor skills.

After two months of taking Re:immune daily, my body has changed remarkably. I feel more awake and stronger. I have much more energy and enjoy doing physical things. I feel mentally sharper and more awake which makes my life much more enjoyable. I’m amazed at the effectiveness of this product!

#TBT – Dill – History and Benefits

Spices, herbs, tinctures and essential oils have been used for millennia to season our food, heal our bodies and boost our spirits. In our Throwback Thursday (#TBT) series, we at re:iimmune will take you back in history to learn how these gifts from Mother Nature have been used. We’ll focus on their use through the ages and beneficial purposes in regard to nutrition, natural health and household care. Today we focus on the wonders of dill!

These days, dill is known primarily as a pickling herb and though it is common in many gardens, it’s not widely used for medicinal properties. However, since ancient times and still today it’s been used by herbalists as a digestive aid to ease gas, infant colic, to induce sleep and treat kidney problems.

In the ancient Egyptian Ebers papyrus from around 1500 BCE, lists dill as an ingredient for a painkiller mixture. The Greeks are said to have used fronds of dill to cover their eyes to induce sleep and even it’s name is derived from a Norse word “dylla” which means “to lull” or soothe. Modern German studies have shown the herb to be an effective treatment against intestinal bacteria.

The seeds of the plant contain an oil which has antibacterial properties which help destroy the intestinal bacteria that lead to ulcers and other intestinal issues. The herb contains stimulating essential oils that activate digestive juices and is helpful in relieving constipation. It’s also very effective at combating halitosis and in India, the seeds are often chewed to treat bad breath.

It has also been commonly used throughout history by nursing mothers to increase milk production and deter colic in newborns. The essential oils of the herb can also help with the stimulation of hormones helping to keep menstrual cycles regular. The plant is also a good source of calcium, helping to reduce bone loss in postmenopausal women.

In addition to all of the above, dill is also a good source of fiber, manganese, magnesium and iron.

To store fresh dill, it’s a good idea to keep it wrapped in a damp towel or stems in a glass of water in the refrigerator. It is a fragile herb and therefore will only keep for a couple of days. You can also freeze it, whole or chopped in an airtight baggie or container. Dill seeds, if stored in a sealed container and kept in a cool, dry place, will stay fresh for about six months.

Cucumber Dill Greek Yogurt Salad

Creamy Cauliflower Dill Soup

Pickled Dill Green Beans

Preventing and Easing Constipation

Constipation, infrequent or difficult to pass bowel movements, can cause abdominal pain and bloating. It’s a pretty common complaint among those eating a low fiber diet. Foods such as eggs, red meat and cheese are low-fiber/high fat and slow down digestion. Balancing out your diet with plenty of high fiber foods help to rev up that sluggish digestive system and is one of the best ways of preventing and treating constipation.

There are other less well-known causes of constipation. Certain medications such as narcotic painkillers, antacids, blood pressure medications and allergy medicines containing antihistamines can be the culprit behind constipation. People suffering from hypothyroidism, where the thyroid gland is underactive, are dealing with a slowed metabolic process. This includes the digestive system.

Lack of exercise also plays a major role in constipation. Too much sitting can really slow down the system whereas activity and good muscle development helps to keep digestion running smoothly.

Back to those high fiber foods! The average American only consumes around 13 grams of fiber per day which doesn’t even come close to the recommended amount. Women ages 18 to 50 should be getting 25 grams per day and men in the same age bracket should have 38 grams. After age 50, the numbers go down slightly at 21 grams for women and 30 grams for men. The most fiber filled foods include fruits (pears, berries, apples and oranges), vegetables (carrots, potatoes, squash, broccoli and Brussels sprouts), beans, lentils, split peas, whole grain breads, brown rice, oatmeal, nuts and seeds.

Last but certainly not least is making sure you are fully hydrated. The digestive process slows down considerably when we aren’t taking in enough water and dehydration can lead to constipation. Using re:iimmune helps to optimize your digestive tract as it contains L-Glutamine which draws water over the intestinal wall and aids in absorption. We’ve also included probiotics, friendly bacteria, and a prebiotic food source to encourage healthy bacterial growth. Kick constipation to the curb with proper hydration, a high fiber diet and plenty of exercise!

Whole Foods Spotlight – Strawberries

 

While many folks today would list strawberries as their favorite fruit, this now beloved berry has gone through periods of history where it was practically shunned. Technically, it’s not truly a fruit since the seeds are on the outside surface. Botanically speaking it’s related to the rose.  We know that early peoples enjoyed strawberries as the seeds have been found at Mesolithic, Neolithic and Iron Age sites. However, the fruit was not cultivated until the 14th century.

The strawberry is mentioned in early Roman writings, including Virgil who warned children to keep an eye out for snakes when picking the wild, low growing fruit. This caution toward the berry stuck and strawberries became associated with danger, with 12th century Saint Hildegard of Germany declaring them unfit for eating because snakes and toads and other slithery creatures could crawl on and among the fruit. Finally in the 14th century, the French put an end to its undeserved bad reputation and began cultivating the plant.  The first 1200 strawberry plants were put in the gardens of the Louvre on the command of King Charles V.

As European settlers arrived in Americas they discovered that native people had also cultivated a wild strawberry with much more success in size and flavor. In the 18th century, the American and Chilean varieties were crossed, resulting in the first of all cultivated strawberries known today Fragaria x ananassa. The word “strawberry” more than likely derives from the practice of growing the cultivated fruit upon straw and some Native Americans called them “wuttahimneash” which translates to “heart-seed berry”.

High in fiber, the strawberry helps to improve digestion, especially if you are suffering from constipation or irregular stools. They help to improve cardiovascular health as the ellagic acid and flavonoids provide antioxidant effects. Strawberries also help to lower LDL cholesterol, the bad cholesterol which leads to plaque build-up in the arteries and the potassium found in the berry helps to counteract the negative effects of sodium, regulating pressure and preventing high blood pressure. They are also wonderful for skin care as the salicylic acid exfoliates dead skin cells, brightening and softening the skin and tightening pores.

 

Strawberry Oatmeal Face Mask

 

Strawberry Salsa
Strawberry Avocado Spinach Salad with Chicken

Foods for a Healthy Liver

Earlier we talked about the functions of the liver and the important role it plays in keeping us well. We focused in on what not to do in order to keep it functioning optimally such as limiting alcohol intake and acetominophen consumption and exercising to maintain a healthy weight. Today we’ve got some suggestions of what one can consume to promote liver health!

Leafy Greens (spinach, swiss chard, kale, collard greens, cabbage, lettuce)

These foods should be a staple in any healthy diet. They supply us with good amounts of protein, calcium, iron and fiber and are an excellent source of many vitamins and minerals. They are one of the best sources for Vitamin K which triggers the production of the protein osteocalcin, essential for healthy bones. They are also low in calories, making them ideal for weight management. In regard to the liver, leafy greens act as protectants for the liver due to their ability to neutralize chemicals, pesticides and metals.

Turmeric

We’ve discussed turmeric and it’s many great properties on this blog before. This rhizome which is typically grated into a powder, typical to Indian cuisine, is gaining more and more attention here in the west and throughout the world for it’s many health benefits including protection against inflammation. Turmeric is a great friend to the liver in that it assists our bodies in the digestion of fats and stimulates the production of bile.

Fruits  – Grapefruit, Lemon and Avocados

Citrus fruits such as lemon and grapefruit are high in Vitamin C and antioxidant properties and aid in the digestion process. They also assist the liver in flushing out carcinogens and toxins.

Avocados produce a type of antioxidant, glutathione, which is required by the liver to filter out harmful materials.

Fermented Foods

Foods such as sauerkraut, kombucha and kimchee are loaded with good bacteria due to the fermentation process. They are known immunity boosters and also help the liver flush out heavy metals.

Whole Foods Spotlight – Orange

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well if one has not dined well” – Virginia Woolf

It is in this spirit that we present re:iimmune’s new blog series “Whole Foods Spotlight” where we will focus in on a specific whole food, its nutritional benefits and provide you with a few links to some tasty recipes that may inspire you to add more of that particular food into your diet. 

After all, good health begins with good nutrition! Today it’s all about the juicy, sweet orange!

The first wild ancestor of the sweet orange we are familiar with today probably evolved in Australia and New Guinea. These early citron fruits made it to the Asian continent and spread west toward Africa. Citrons have been found in Egyptian tomb paintings from 1000 BC.  These fruits were not juicy and people mainly ate the rind of the fruit and used it for perfumes. Very early on it was used in India as a treatment for scurvy (Vitamin C deficiency). However, these citrons are not the ancestors of the modern orange. Either Chinese or Indian food scientists bred the pomelo and mandarin together sometime around 314 BC and developed both the bitter orange and the more familiar to Western culture, sweet orange. The word orange is derived from “naranga”, the word for orange trees in India. As oranges spread their way across the world throughout the centuries they have been prized for their sweet, juiciness and many health benefits.

Immune Support and Digestive Health

High Vitamin C content means oranges are a fantastic choice to drive away nasty germs and bugs and preventing colds, flu and ear infections. Vitamin C is also aids in the prevention of ulcers and the high fiber content of oranges ensure a healthy colon. Fiber also helps to reduce constipation and diarrhea.

Vision Protection

Loaded with carotenoids, oranges are a great choice in preventing night blindness and macular degeneration.

Healthy Skin

Sweet Orange Oil has been touted for its ability to stimulate collagen production, easing inflammation and improving the flow of blood to the skin and clearing clogged pores.

Heart Health

Oranges contain hesperidin which has been shown to lower both high blood pressure and cholesterol in animal studies. Most of this phytonutrient can be found in the peel and inner white pulp of the orange so it’s benefits are lost when the fruit is processed into juice. Vitamin C also helps to prevent arteriosclerosis which is hardening of the arteries.

Hopefully reading this made you long for an orange as much as writing it did for me! I’m off to peel one now. Hope you enjoy the links below . . .

Sliced Fennel, Orange and Almond Salad

20 Orange Essential Oil Uses

Make Your Own Dried Orange Peel

#TBT – Sage – History and Benefits

Spices, herbs, tinctures and essential oils have been used for millennia to season our food, heal our bodies and boost our spirits. In our Throwback Thursday (#TBT) series, we at re:iimmune will take you back in history to learn how these gifts from Mother Nature have been used. We’ll focus on their use through the ages and beneficial purposes in regard to nutrition, natural health and household care. This week we focus on the herbal savior, sage!

SAGE.TIF

“How can a man grow old who has sage in his garden?” is an old proverb quoted throughout much of Europe, China and Persia. During the 17th century, sage was so valued by the Chinese that Dutch merchants discovered that they would trade three chests of Chinese tea for just one chest of sage. The word sage derives from the Latin word salvare which means “to save” bestowed for it’s many healing and curative properties.

Native Americans called the sagebrush “spirit caller” and used it in the cleansing and purification of their dwellings. Still today, people looking to cleanse their home of bad vibes or just to refresh the air will burn a smudge stick made of sage. Some even find relief from the smoke for sinus congestion or pain as well as migraines. Sage contains saponins which improve circulation and its been used for over a thousand years in the treatment of Cerebrovascular disease. Like its family member rosemary, it is also known for improving memory and many studies are showing that it may even help treat and prevent Alzheimer’s. With these benefits, it’s no wonder we use the word “sage” to describe a very wise person!

The herb  is prized for it’s strong flavor and for many people the smell of it evokes the holidays. Which is perfect, as the herb is known for its ability to assist the body in digesting all those fatty foods we enjoy this time of year! Also, red sage has been used traditionally as a treatment for inflammation of the mouth, throat and tonsils so it’s one to turn to for relief during cold season.

In the garden, sage is a fragrant and often overlooked spring flowering plant. There are dozens of varieties; some for cooking, some for medicinal purposes and some ornamental. Most are very hardy and prefer well drained soil. Common sage, which is most often used in cooking, produces beautiful purple flowers which attract bees and other beneficial insects to the garden.

We’ve collected a few useful DIY’s for you that take advantage of sage’s many wonderful offerings. Enjoy!

Sage Tincture for Colds and Sore Throats (scroll to bottom of article)

Homegrown Smudge Sticks

Fresh Sage Wreath

What is a Hydrobiotic™?

When you make new things, you get to make up new words- so that’s what we did! Dr. Kerri Miller created a mighty combination of Clinical Strength Hydration®, and a multi strain pre and probiotic blend containing a special combination of 14 different probiotics and one prebiotic (the food probiotics require in order to flourish). When you look at the various keys to recovery, you’ll see that very high up on the list sit both hydration and intestinal health. Alongside these two vital components of recovery, you’ll also see adequate rest, a healthy diet, exercise, and a positive mindset listed.
hydro

Dr. Miller saw a missing piece in our healthcare system after working in it for over 20 years. We weren’t providing adequate means for our patients to stay hydrated and improve their intestinal health in an easy and accessible way, so she did something about it! She began her journey to create a solution, the first oral Hydrobiotic™. The first and foremost portion of this equation is “Hydro”, which represents the Clinical Strength Hydration® formula found in re:iimmune®. It is the first sugar free hydration pack made for rapid hydration needs. The “biotic” in Hydrobiotic™ stands for, you guessed it, probiotics! Not only did Dr. Miller witness her patients struggling to stay hydrated, but many medicines given in critical situations such as cancer, surgery and chronic illness, take costly tolls on your digestive health.

The pre and probiotic blend in re:iimmune® was especially formulated to promote restoration of the beneficial gut flora (good bacteria) that keep your digestive system balanced and functioning properly. L-Glutamine is an amino acid found in re:iimmune® that has more than one purpose, not only is it a co-transporter that helps your cells absorb hydration quicker, but it also helps rebuild healthy tissue in your intestinal wall. The ginger extract found in re:iimmune® boosts immunity, aids in digestive health and also reduces nausea. In cases of chemotherapy patients, antibiotic use and pregnancy, nausea is a common symptom and ginger is a safe solution. As you see, the Hydrobiotic™ formula in re:iimmune® represents it’s core combination of both hydration and probiotic supplementation, but the moving parts that make re:iimmune® the best way to get better, better™ are vast!

If you found this post helpful or interesting, please feel free to share it on your favorite social media platform!

No More Bandaids

Why Wednesday

“I’ve strugglSarah_Garzaed for most of my adult life with constant UTI’s and in 2014, this reached an all-time high. I was pregnant, and during this pregnancy, I had 7 (yes 7) bladder infections and consumed countless rounds of antibiotics. By the end of it, I was exhausted, frustrated and feeling awful. My doctors decided to put me on a daily prescription that I would have to take for the rest of my life. Not a cure by any means, but a ‘bandaid” just to get me by. After reading the side effects of the medication, I knew I had to find a way to heal myself naturally. I began a diet of whole foods, and I started pumping my body full of probiotics. During this personal health revolution, a friend of mine told me about re:iimmune. It sounded like everything I was trying to put in my body all in one small packet! I ordered some re:iimmune almost immediately. Now, re:iimmune has become a part of mine and my family’s regular health routine. Sometimes, if I’m feeling particularly run down, I’ll take it once a day for several days in a row. Recently I had a stomach virus and the only thing I could keep in my system was the re:iimmune. My body was able to heal itself while staying hydrated. It’s been over a year and a half and I haven’t had one UTI, nor have I been on any antibiotics. I also never did take the prescription that was supposed to make my life “bearable”.  For me, this is a medical miracle! I’m the healthiest I’ve ever been and I contribute this to great gut health with the help of re:iimmune. I feel better at 40 than I did at 30, and I’m expecting a healthy baby boy this summer.” -Sarah

 

As a society, we have just begun to scratch the surface when it comes to our understanding of digestive health, and the effect it has on our overall health- the benefits of a healthy gut are proving to be endless! From energy improvements, uplifted moods, hormone balance and generalized health- to notable improvements in chronic illnesses and serious diseases. Digestive health has been linked back to all things positive in regards to our wellbeing. It’s time that we stop putting “Band-Aids” on our laundry list of symptoms, and begin to heal ourselves from the inside out.

When it comes to a healthy digestive system, there isn’t one explanation, one supplement, or one diet to correct the complexities of each individual body. Instead, it takes work, research and an open mind to find what’s right for you and your body. One thing we do know is that no matter who you are, or what your body tolerates, adequate hydration and healthy intestinal bacteria will assist your body in its attempt to heal itself. re:iimmune® contains a multi-strain probiotic blend that is accompanied by a prebiotic which acts as food for the probiotics and in turn, aids in your healthy intestinal bacteria’s growth. At the core of re:iimmune® is our Clinical Strength Hydration® formula which helps your body maintain optimal function for all of its vital organs, while strengthening your immune system. If you’re feeling distraught over reoccurring symptoms, a negative prognosis, or a plateau in your personal health goals, add re:iimmune® to your routine and get better, better™!

Shake it Off!

Why Wednesday 

lezley_Dhonau“After a 4 month run of colds, flu, stomach ache and sickness- I felt unable to shake off the last of it each time to be able to fully recover. I then got hit with oral thrush which really told me my guts were not in a good way and I suspected I was chronically dehydrated too. With just the first few mouthfuls of re:iimmune I feel uplifted and more energized. It’s like drinking a fresh coconut…you know it is good – it feels like it is instantly boosting your health!  I changed the food I eat to clean out my system, but the re:iimmune has been a key part of recovering fully and resetting my gut to a healthier state, and no cramping. I am passionate about only putting natural foods in my body and re:iimmune fits this need for me. It is now a firm addition to my medical kit.” -L. Dhonau
Those first few hints of a cold or flu normally send you running for the medicine cabinet with determination. You tell yourself “I will not let this slow me down!” If you begin to fight it early on, you just might be fortunate enough to kick the infection before it’s got you stuck to your bed for a week or so. Although, when an infection does take up roots, it may send you on a downward spiral that can last weeks, or months before you fully recover. When you eventually do recover, you are often left with a compromised immune system, and the after effects that most common symptom relievers leave behind. Chronic illness patients can attest to the fact that feeling ill for long periods of time can feel discouraging, but don’t give up. After you’ve conquered an illness, it’s important to remember that your immune system has taken a hit and will be left more vulnerable to further infection even after your symptoms have cleared up.
The illness recovery formula in re:iimmune® contains just what your body needs in order to shake off an infection, or infections. Hydration is a key component to your body’s ability to create healthy cells and a strong immune system. Often times, when you’re experiencing cold and flu symptoms, drinking fluids is easier said than done, and your hydration levels drop as a result. The ginger root in re:iimmune® helps to soothe an upset stomach as the Clinical Strength Hydration® Formula, and multi strain pre and probiotic blend, get to balancing out your body’s hydration and intestinal immune support needs. Since re:iimmune® is sugar free, and doesn’t contain toxic coloring agents, your body won’t have to spend it’s energy figuring out what to protect itself against and what to use to heal itself. Since nearly 70% of your body’s immune system is located in  your intestines, our intestinal immune support formula boosts the very core of your immune system while helping you get back up on your feet.
Take a tip from our friend in the U.K.- keep re:iimmune® as a firm addition to your medical kit, and get better, better™!